Women's Fashion, Writing LAB

“Frock Me” and my love for Vintage Fairs

Captura de ecrã 2014-04-9, às 12.14.24 On sunday morning I went to the “Frock Me” vintage fashion fair in Chelsea for the first time, and absolutely loved it. We can find good bargains there, and the items are amazing: lots of authentic Hermès, YSL and Dior scarves, YSL dresses and so many fabulous items, that I wanted to buy. I got to buy a vintage Mulberry bege maxi-skirt and a pair of Belgian 1960s earrings that are just adorable and that weirdly remind me more of the 80s than of the 60s (and that’s exactly why I bought them) – born in the 80s, love the 80s! So that you know, Frock Me next event will be on May 4th.

It is incredible how many fantastic items we can find at such a fair. I cannot deny I am crazy about vintage clothes, so vintage fairs are my “Primark”. I don’t mind spending a bit more in a vintage piece, but I admit that bargains are also quite appealing to my eyes, and you can find good bargains at such fairs, oh yes you do! Also, the fact that those pieces are unique and the mere idea you can combine them with one of the season trends you like, reinventing it somehow according to your own style makes this experience quite special and exciting at the same time. I am an early 80s girl, I’m not ashamed of admitting it (which makes me 31) and I honestly cannot stand the single idea of wearing an exact same outfit as someone else (unless it’s on purpose – more on that later), or wearing a straight-out-of-the-catwalk outfit, without giving it a personal touch that will make the difference. To me, vintage clothes provide that extra personal touch in some of my outfits.

Something that I also usually fantasize about when it comes to vintage clothes is the story behind each piece. I’m always curious to know what’s the story and maybe history of each piece: Who wore it? Who did it belong to in the first place? How old is it? How much was it loved before I bought it? Was its initial owner as passionate about it as I am? These are questions I will never have the answers for, but I adore imagining what the answers for those are.

For Primark lovers, I have nothing against it, but I actually have some rules about Primark that I tend to follow myself: I always try not to spend much money there, as I know the quality is usually low, so the maximum money I spend there is probably £20 (usually less) every two months probably. Also, I tend to either go for very cheap items (preferably on sale), or for something that will eventually turn into an hilarious moment for me and my girl friends. That’s exactly what we did yesterday: we went there and bought same Marvel sweater-dresses (one for each) so that one day we’d go out at night wearing similar outfits – I wonder what the reactions will be (some people may actually think they’re delusional or even drunk “Oh look, 1 girl wearing a Marvel dress! No, is that 2? Wait, 3?! I must buy some new lenses! 4?! I’ve definitely got to stop drinking!“). To make it even more perfect, I’ll just have to convince them to wear neon-pink bob wigs – EASY!

What about you? Are you more of a Primark-lover, or are you a vintage-addict buyer like me?

For more on More than Labels,

Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | Youtube

Download ASAP54 and try it!

Know more about it HERE, HERE, HERE and HERE.

LOVE,

Vera

[the initial photos were taken from the Frock Me vintage fashion fair website.]

Fashion News

Fashion, Beauty and the Digital Revolution – VOGUE Festivals 2014

The panel of speakers: Pixie Geldof, Mary Katrantzou, Miroslava Duma and Nick Knight

The panel of speakers: Pixie Geldof, Mary Katrantzou, Miroslava Duma and Nick Knight

First of all, I need to apologize for my absence recently. Some of you may not know, but I am also the editor-in-chief of a monthly newspaper and the last days have been very tough, as it was out today. I also have a parallel project to my blogs and to the newspaper, that I’ve been working on, but we’ll see how it goes. So, last Sunday, the 30th March, I went to the “Fashion, Beauty and the Digital Revolution” Talk at the Vogue Festival 2014. I won’t lie to you: I couldn’t wait to see Mary Katrantzou and Miroslava Duma, and of course, what also made it extra appealing for me was the talks topic, which for a blogger and someone who’s gradually becoming so interested in digital marketing was a big PLUS! The speakers were Pixie Geldof, Mary Katrantzou, Miroslava Duma and Nick Knight. My first impressions: Pixie Geldof is very funny, very funky, very relaxed; Mary Katrantzou is good-humoured, clever, and creative; Miroslava Duma is elegant and spreads peacefulness; Nick Knight is eloquent, bright and has got an innovative vision towards fashion. I must admit I was so focused on all these personalities that I didn’t take as many notes as I would like to. However, one of the aspects that I was curious to about was how Miroslava Duma became such a successful entrepreneur, and it was all about directing all the interest of the press on her, to her own business Buro 24/7, the website she founded that covers fashion, culture and lifestyle 24 hours, 7 days a week. She was smart enough to take advantage of all the attention she had gotten from the media and from fashion labels. Miroslava also admitted preferring to have published on Buro 24/7 any news on Russian designers, rather than other nationalities. When highlighting the designer’s talent, she naturally goes for her country’s own creative minds. She explained that Russia’s fashion stopped its development for nearly 70 years, as the government expected everyone to wear the same clothes, being different or making a statement with your style was considered a crime. That’s why suddenly there are so many Russian designers coming up, and that’s the reason she so fondly supports her country’s own designers: she wants them to keep up their exceptional work after so many years of inactivity in a country filled, after all, with so much talent. Mary Katrantzou highlighted the fact that she doesn’t control her label’s Facebook page, but she does control their Instagram page, which means she’s the one posting there, not one of her assistants – it is great to know that, as it helps build a closer connection with all the admirers of her work, such as me.The fashion designer confessed the most difficult thing when managing her Instagram account is to find the right boundaries between what’s personal and what’s commercial. She also expressed she has her costumers and bloggers’ feedback on her collections taken into high consideration (particularly when she was starting her own business). She admits to reading the reviews to her collections, as it helps reflect back and assess if the designer’s intention was received by the public. Katrantzou acknowledges that criticism is important, every time the opinion is substantiated. Mary explained that it is possible to assess the public’s reaction at the runway shows as well, as their reactions to her collections are spontaneous and, in a certain way, ‘raw’, which sometimes makes those very representative of what to expect of the general public. Nick Knight, the renowned British Fashion Photographer and director of showstudio.coma platform where you get to watch fashion films and runways shows and comment online, acknowledged the importance of criticism, saying showstudio.com allows people to honestly comment on shows, which is becoming more and more difficult, as nobody seems to criticize brands. Knight is all for supporting the freedom of speech in freedom as, according to his own words, “fashion needs criticism“. Pixie Geldof’s interventions in the discussion were always the funniest ones. She definitely is amusing. She took the opportunity to talk about her digital platform Funky Offish, where you can buy jewelry and tees and explain its concept. All in all, it was definitely a very informative discussion, and which gave us a  insight of the importance of digital online platforms nowadays.

For more on More than Labels,

Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | Youtube

Download ASAP54 and try it!

Know more about it HERE, HERE, HERE and HERE.

LOVE, Vera